Bigger languages are simpler

Alex sends this: According to research quoted by the Economist, the number of speakers of a language correlates best with its lack of complecity. http://www.economist.com/sciencetechnology/displayStory.cfm?story_id=15384310 The researchers are Gary Lupyan of the University of Pennsylvania and Rick Dale of the

Bigger languages are simpler

Alex sends this: According to research quoted by the Economist, the number of speakers of a language correlates best with its lack of complecity. http://www.economist.com/sciencetechnology/displayStory.cfm?story_id=15384310 The researchers are Gary Lupyan of the University of Pennsylvania and Rick Dale of the

Regional accents – on the up, or not?

The Daily Telegraph has a story that they are. Forecasts have suggested accents would disappear and merge into a national way of speaking, albeit with some class and regional variations. But experts found that Geordie, Scouse, Mancunian, and Brummie accents

Regional accents – on the up, or not?

The Daily Telegraph has a story that they are. Forecasts have suggested accents would disappear and merge into a national way of speaking, albeit with some class and regional variations. But experts found that Geordie, Scouse, Mancunian, and Brummie accents

Egypt boosts Arabic web content

[Andrew] Egypt is going to put its archives, in Arabic, onto the web to promote the amount of Arabic web content available globally. The domain name organisation ICANN voted to allow non-Latin scripts in domain names in November, although the

Egypt boosts Arabic web content

[Andrew] Egypt is going to put its archives, in Arabic, onto the web to promote the amount of Arabic web content available globally. The domain name organisation ICANN voted to allow non-Latin scripts in domain names in November, although the

Language death by numbers

Anyone interested in the ‘language death’ phenomenon (and debate) would do well to start with David Crystal’s preface to his book on the subject. It helps give some scale to the phenomenon and explains some conflicting numbers as well as

Language death by numbers

Anyone interested in the ‘language death’ phenomenon (and debate) would do well to start with David Crystal’s preface to his book on the subject. It helps give some scale to the phenomenon and explains some conflicting numbers as well as

Language stigmas

This rather odd story about a linguist who spoke to his son exclusively in Klingon for the first three years of his life made me wonder whether there are stigmas against using minority languages. In France it seems there are.

Language stigmas

This rather odd story about a linguist who spoke to his son exclusively in Klingon for the first three years of his life made me wonder whether there are stigmas against using minority languages. In France it seems there are.

Language extinction not equal to cultural extinction

Futurismic points to a piece by John McWhorter: […] the oft-heard claim that the death of a language means the death of a culture puts the cart before the horse. When the culture dies, naturally the language dies along with

Language extinction not equal to cultural extinction

Futurismic points to a piece by John McWhorter: […] the oft-heard claim that the death of a language means the death of a culture puts the cart before the horse. When the culture dies, naturally the language dies along with

Endangered and invented languages

Via Andy Stubbings (from a month or so back): I noticed a couple of these, not sure whether relevant but here you go http://blog.longnow.org/2009/03/23/daniel-everett-endangered-languages-lost-knowledge-and-the-future/ (Their podcasts are always really good anyway, even if this isn’t useful for your project) http://blog.longnow.org/2009/06/01/klingon-elvish-and-esperanto-linguist-takes-a-serious-look-at-invented-languages/

Endangered and invented languages

Via Andy Stubbings (from a month or so back): I noticed a couple of these, not sure whether relevant but here you go http://blog.longnow.org/2009/03/23/daniel-everett-endangered-languages-lost-knowledge-and-the-future/ (Their podcasts are always really good anyway, even if this isn’t useful for your project) http://blog.longnow.org/2009/06/01/klingon-elvish-and-esperanto-linguist-takes-a-serious-look-at-invented-languages/